Brave

Brave

Sara Bareilles has an album releasing in the not too distant future.  It sounds like it will be titled The Blessed Unrest.  A new single entitled Brave releases to the world on April 23rd.  Hear it here…

It’s quickly growing on me.   Sara’s last EP, Once Upon A Time, really sparked my imagination, left me day-dreaming, and brought me many smiles.  I’m not a vocalist nor musician by any stretch of the imagination.  If I was, I’m left wondering  how I would name my albums.  Here’s a fun insight into Sara’s thought process for naming her next album:

I love the classic gas station “dinging” sound for each album name.  I’ll have to make something similar for my smart phone notifications.

I don’t really know anything about Martha Graham.  I gather she has something important to do with dance (or dance ideology).  I also dance very seldom  and infrequently in public (Elaine’s dance from Seinfeld immediately comes to mind), but I was intrigued by the quote Sara mentions in the video clip.  Martha Graham is quoted as saying…

There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all of time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and it will be lost. The world will not have it. It is not your business to determine how good it is nor how valuable nor how it compares with other expressions. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open. You do not even have to believe in yourself or your work. You have to keep yourself open and aware to the urges that motivate you. Keep the channel open. … No artist is pleased. [There is] no satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a queer divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others.
~ As quoted in The Life and Work of Martha Graham (1991) by Agnes de Mille, p. 264, ISBN 0-394-55643-7.

At first glance, I’m sceptical.  What’s she really saying… a life force?  I agree, we all have a God-given soul, but I’m not sure if I’d call it a life force?  I’m reading the part about unique expression and equating to creativity (or creative spirit).  I agree.  I think God has enriched each person with unique talents and gifts, most of which too easily get dismissed or squandered away.  And it seems true, that when people suppress their gifts and talents (for whatever reason), people around them, their community, society as a whole, everyone loses out on that individual’s God-given abilities.

I would caution people to “keep yourself open and aware to the urges that motivate you. Keep the channel open.”  I think I get her context, but certainly would NOT suggest that a person be open to urges that drive him to overeat or to drink in excess (or even worse things I’m now imagining as I type this).

“…No artist is pleased.”

This is such an understatement about perfectionism.  I wrestle with this in my work, my writing, my photography, my drawings, my painting, and almost every part of my life.  Just trying to write a blog just about kills me at times (maybe because I’m such a newbie).  I can relate to a consistent state of dissatisfaction with many things, creative things, and various parts of my life.  The unrest… it bugs me.   I’ve never thought of it as a blessed unrest, but it’s eerily familiar.

I find some inspiration and encouragement in the Brave song lyrics…

Let your words be anything but empty
Why don’t you tell them the truth?

Say what you wanna say
And let the words fall out
Honestly I wanna see you be brave

STAGEIT… featuring Lenka

Sara Bareilles is the first performance I ever saw on StageIt.  The second, just last Sunday, was a concert hosted by the Australian pop singer, Lenka.  Never heard of her?  Neither had my wife, so consider yourself in good company.  If you’ve scene the Windows 8 commercial linked below, then you’ve definitely heard Lenka.  Not necessarily my favorite song from Lenka, but her music indeed.

The StageIt company hosts live concerts through their virtual venue online.  Typically, these concerts are smaller productions, intimate in nature, and stream live from the performer’s studio, kitchen, or living room.

Lenka’s music is something I accidentally discovered while searching Youtube for a specific scene from Inglourious Basterds, dubbed Chapter Five: Revenge of the Giant Face.   In the Quentin Tarantino film, Shosanna (Mélanie Laurent), the pretty protagonist, finalizes her revenge plans upon the murderous Nazi oppressors.  Maybe it’s because I’m a part of that MTV generation, but I especially like how the film’s scenes play out to the tune of David Bowie’s Cat People (…putting out fires with gasoline).

The clip I was actually looking for was something like this…

The Lenka clip I ended up discovering along the way was this…

(As you can see above) I stumbled upon a well-edited music video where the creator uses clips of Inglourious Basterds set to Lenka’s song, Trouble is a Friend.  Technology has clearly blossomed  since the birth of early MTV; now just about anyone with a half decent computer can make their own music videos, and many of these home-brewed productions look really professional.  Lenka was new to me.  My curiosity lead me to investigate more of her music.  I end up watching her very creative offerings on YouTube (Trouble is a Friend and The Show).  I’m not what people might call a raving Lenka fan (nor anyone for that matter), but I do enjoy her music and have added it to my personal soundtrack (the ever-growing eclectic unofficial soundtrack for my life).

Like with so many of my online searches, I start surfing for one specific purpose.  Somewhere along the way I follow a link, click another, then another, and then many URLs (and hours) later I end up in a totally different place than what was planned.  It leaves me wondering, “Where does all the time go?”  This last week, I received an email invitation to see Jars of Clay at (or on) StageIt.  While investigating the concert date for Jars, I notice a banner advertising that Lenka’s backyard concert in a couple days.  It sounds cool and costs less than a latte; sign me up!

Concert Day:

Sunday is a typical spring day in Calgary–the kind that makes locals want to hibernate because of the relentless snow (more snow, and… yep, more snow).  My family and I gather round the TV to watch Lenka on StageIt’s live broadcast from sunny Sydney, Australia.  My kids watch for about five minutes before their attention spans fade.  Jana indicates that she’s not a really “into” Lenka’s voice.  I like to think her musical tastes are still developing.  Justin says, “Dad, I’m enjoying the show, but there’s video game missions that need to be completed before bedtime.”  Meanwhile, Lenka, her drummer,  a violinist, and another fellow playing the cello perform a handful of songs from her living room to our home.

During concerts, StageIt provides a way for viewers to text messages to the Performer (which are view-able by members of the audience, assuming they’re reading along instead of watching the concert).  Multitasking isn’t my forte, hence I opt to remain “textually” silent.  For a concert, the visual quality seems a bit rough around the edges, but the audio is far than I had expected, especially since its streaming from the far side of the globe.  Despite being light on production or polish, Lenka’s show totally makes up for it because of the intimate feel of the whole thing.  Before the performance, I knew of Lenka as a vocalist and musician.  It turns out she’s also an actress, a sculpturist,  a songwriter, and even an crafty artist who creates set decorations!  In highschool, if Lenka was my classmate, friends would have joked that she was becoming a real Renaissance Man (well actually a Renaissance Woman). Classmates and I stole the term Renaissance Man as a polite way of teasing someone who might be considered an overachiever.

Lenka

In between songs Lenka draws attention to this site called PledgeMusic.com.  I kind of understood it involved a charity and charities are mentioned on Pledge Music, but whatever the case…  a person can make pledges to finance artists’ projects.  So figuring I might enjoy her new album (available in June 2013), I investigate.  Much to my surprise, Lenka fans can pledge money for not just her new album, but also some pretty amazing creations handcrafted by Lenka herself… very personable.

Signed Posters, CDs, and even Vinyl — $28 to $93
Artistic Doodles on Handwritten Lyric Sheets — $63 — Great idea!
Baby Bibs — $38 — Sorry, not for me as my wife lovingly reminds me that she ONLY signed up for two kiddos *sigh*
Crafty Stuff — $48 to $138
Mystery Craft Stuff — $138 — Oooh!?  Sounds mysterious!
Crafty Fashion Stuff — $138 — Snazzy! Unfortunate for me it cost more than my whole wardrobe :-S
20 Minute Skype Chat — $100 — Intriguing!  It’s not everyday you get to speak face-to-face with a  Renaissance Woman!
Personalized Ring Tone or Greeting  — $150 – Cool! And practical too!  It’s a shame that no one ever calls me.

and the kicker…
A Personalized Lullaby — only $1,500 — Awesome! I wish I needed (or could enjoy) a lullaby, but I’m all lights out when my head hits the pillow.

jgh_LENKA_SHADOWS_cdsleevelayout_2I’m looking forward to hearing some new Lenka in June.  The Pledge Music profile describes her new album, Shadows, as “… a collection of lullabies for adults…Lenka style.”  Interesting.  Until then, I guess I’ll just sing myself to sleep.

Being Big In Japan

The other night, I happened upon this clip of Swing Out Sister (SOS) on YouTube.  It dates back to 96 or 97, back when SOS had definitely declined from most North American limelight.  I’ve been a longtime fan of SOS since my first listen in the late 80s (you might remember Breakout and Twilight World); their British sophisti-pop style appealed to my overgrown eclectic appetite for diverse music.

In the clip Andy and Corinne are being interviewed on the Japanese TV show,Music Station, which has been around since 1986 (or so Wikipedia tells me).  Many popular music artists have also been on the show, including… Green Day, Deborah Gibson, Tiffany, Kiss, Aerosmith, Bon Jovi, Boyz II Men, Lenny Kravitz, Charlotte Church, Alanis Morissette, Enya, Destiny’s Child, Shakira, Alicia Keys, Busta Rhymes, Beyoncé, Mariah Carey, Avril Lavigne, Hilary Duff, The Offspring, Backstreet Boys, Stevie Wonder, James Blunt, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Fergie, Sarah Brightman, U2, Kanye West, Maroon 5, Flo Rida, Lady Gaga, The Black Eyed Peas, Oasis, Christina Aguilera, Norah Jones, Taylor Swift, Rihanna, Carly Rae Jepsen, and many other artists (ones I didn’t know by name).  The show equates to the British Top of the Pops in how it features popular media and rising music stars.

To me, the Youtube clip captures a moderately awkward interview…

My observations:
What kind of host wears sunglasses while conducting an interview?  I love the co-host’s pink pop filter on her microphone–it seems kinda 80s, but in the 90s.  With the translator on the left, there’s a lot communication going on during the interview, but if you listen clearly, you can hear it’s their first time in Japan (Corinne nods).   When the host asks about where they’d been already, Corinne indicates a reference to some record store.  In there place, I would too, mostly because I wouldn’t have a clue how to pronounce anything else.  “I want to buy some workmen’s trousers.”  I didn’t quite get what Corinne was saying about the workmen’s trousers so I had to look them up…worker_trousers

So here’s the stylish Japanese work wear… It looks pretty snazzy when you compare it with the gear at Mark’s Work Warehouse.  I’m not sure how safe those flair bottoms would be, but hey, it’s fashionable.tabi

And these are the funky shoes that Corinne indicates with her bare stocking.  Speaking of shoes, I wonder what happened to her shoes.  Maybe the airline lost her luggage. Who knows?!  And is it just me, or do the groupies sitting behind SOS look like they might be on loan from the Power Rangers?  I love their facial expressions too.  Some of them evidently very board with the whole interview (insert imaginary mother’s voice saying, “And remember, while on TV, don’t fidget! And for heaven’s sake don’t lift your dress.”).

Outside of the expected musical giants, like U2, Madonna, or Michael Jackson, a couple other artists I enjoy also went big in Japan, specifically Sara Bareilles and Cathy Dennis.  Japanese culture is very different from Canada, and it makes me curious about the things that end up big in popular culture over there.  It seems appropriate to wind up my ramblings today with this little tune…

Some dads have way too much time on their hands…

I enjoy documentaries, especially popular music documentaries about bands and behind the scenes.  VH1’s Pop Up Video used to be my favorite show on Much Music, though I haven’t seen it in years.  I also haven’t watched Much Music or Much More Music in years.  The other night I caught a 2006 series of documentaries covering the career of Depeche Mode (DM).
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At this point, while writing , I have to ask any friends who are turning up there noses to please bear with me, despite their initial shock.  In my mind, I imagine them saying, “I had no idea he’d listen to those guys.” and I imagine others going on about how “Electronic music sucks!”  The truth is, that my taste in music was and remains eclectic ranging from classical to metal (and nearly everywhere between).  I’m certainly not DM’s biggest fan, but did and do enjoy their music in limited doses.
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While I was growing up, I think DM was especially interesting to me because the band were pioneers in MIDI and musical sampling.  Most people I knew didn’t listen to DM for any lyrical genius, but rather for how the band fused pop music with emerging technology, and without being too far out there (wherever there was).

So after viewing the DM documentary, I stumbled upon this DMK video on youtube.

Clearly, some dads have way too much time on their hands… or maybe this Bolivian dad is a stay at home dad with his wife working during the day.  How do I know there’s a woman in the picture?  That little girls hair certainly wasn’t done by any dad I know.  Whatever the case, this cover kind of Everything Counts cracked me up.  I shared it with my wife and son, both of whom watched in amazement.  My wife didn’t recall the original song, even after I played the DM version of it.  My son thought it was interesting (not to be confused with cool, though).  Who knows… had I been more musical and had more time on my hands (and a pile of makeshift studio equipment), maybe me and my kids would be doing cover tunes.

I finish off today’s muse with the original, Everything Counts by a much younger Depeche Mode… (for all you who don’t remember either)

Wow! Now There’s a Choir I Might Actually Join…

…assuming they would have me (or by some miracle I wasn’t cut during an audition)!

When I was a kid, my Mom made my brother and me join our church’s Jr. Choir.   Mrs. Craig, the Choir director, probably gained her sainthood while trying to make something out of us elementary boys.  As a child, I really had no appreciation for singing.  Sure, I liked music, but I didn’t have the pipes or the know-how to make my kind of music (or at least the kind  I wanted to listen to).   In those days, my churched peers and I spent many Sunday afternoons practicing and learning songs that we would eventually sing to congregation members of our church.  Practices seemed like torture by boredom intermixed with prolonged lessons about self-control (specifically how to least annoy our beloved Choir director).

Was I talented?  Nope.  Have I acquired more vocal talent since then?  Not even close.  I know I can sing better than some folks, but I’m realistic… meaning I have no delusions of ever getting a recording contract.  Even so, I love music.  I listen to plenty of it, sing it in the shower (or in the car), google to contemplate lyrics, read about it in books, and enjoy finding out useless trivia behind the tunes (usually from artists, songwriters, musicians, producers, or managers).   BTW, does anyone  know what happened to Pop-Up Video anyway?  I used to love that show.

So when I happened upon a video of Choir!Choir!Choir! I thought, “This is a choir I so want to join.”  Watching the video, these people look like they’re having fun, singing their hearts out to some of my favorite songs (Isn’t this the coolest Sloan cover?).  And they’re enjoying beer while doing it… that’s my kind of choir!  It’s too bad I don’t enjoy beer… but I do like the occasional glass of wine.  Enjoying wine while singing old pop songs? Even better!

A couple of my co-workers have mentioned how easily they get sucked into the show Glee.  If you know me, you know I seldom have time for TV (mostly because of my dedication to the Purple Prison), but I have seen parts of Glee episodes to know their appeal.  Popular songs as old as my generation, arranged with a fresh harmonies, and performed by vibrant youth pretty much equals ear candy.  What’s not to like?

Unfortunately, I won’t be auditioning for Choir!Choir!Choir! because they meet in Toronto (which is only a stone’s through from Calgary, if you happen to be Superman.  All 3235 km).  From what I can tell, you pretty much pester the leader on facebook, bring $5 each week, and show up ready to sing.  A singing hack like me might even get in, eventually.  I like how this article indicates this choir has ” solidified a reputation as the best damn no-commitment choir in the city.”

One of their two facebook sites says “Choir! Choir! Choir! is a singing group based in Toronto. Since February of 2011, they have been throwing down and saving lives.”  I’m not exactly sure how they’re saving lives.  From what I know, Jesus Saves.  Conversely, I suspect Choir!Cubed (my nickname, not theirs) might save people from boredom on a weeknight, or from going crazy when lacking an outlet for expression, but these folks don’t seem to be teaching CPR, First Aid, or Lifeguarding.

All the same, I think that the Choir!Cubed brings its members, audience, and random listeners into community.  And couldn’t we all use a little more community–spending time together, friends and strangers, sharing each others company, singing (or listening) together to songs that bring smiles to our faces?  I think it’s why that Cheers intro always tugs on our hearts… “Where everybody knows your name…”

While I was writing this post, it reminded me of an old favorite song that pretty much sums it up.  Sing for the Melody by Sweet Comfort Band “Everybody sing for the Melody, Everybody sing it in Harmony…”

Learn more about Choir!Choir!Choir! here…

blogTO – An informative article about the Choir!Choir!Choir!
http://soundcloud.com/choir-choir-choir – listen to songs recorded by Choir!Choir!Choir!
http://www.choirchoirchoir.com/ – not much here… make sure to scroll left.  Way left.

Does this place Smell Like Teen Spirit?

My oldest child started Jr. High this fall.  I hadn’t anticipated it, but ended up a bit edgy for both her and us old folks (a.k.a the parents).  For Jana, a few tears were shed under the pressure of everything new, unknown, and uncertain.  Recalling those uneasy feelings from our own school days, Karen and I found ourselves at a loss for those perfect words to ease our daughter’s worry.

That was a few days ago.  Everything went just fine.  Insert collective sigh of relief here.  Most fears quickly deflated, and everyone seems excited by the new year.

As our daughter has entered the adolescent years, I’m reminded of how teenagers can sweat, and how those developing sweat glans can… er… what’s the word? Stink.  A couple of days ago we visited Jana’s school for a parental orientation.  The school board seems to have adopted a sparing usage of the air conditioning.  Despite it being September, at the end of the day, the place was stifling and reminded me of the Sahara Dessert.

One of the teachers joked about the place being hot, and the importance of making sure our kids took a daily shower (more for her benefit than the kids).  Later, as we walked down the hallways to our next class meeting I caught a whiff of something.  The school, nearly 30 years old, had a unique odor… maybe even a funk… and then a Kurt Cobain song title popped into mind… Smells Like Teen Spirit.  Maybe that’s what he meant?

Nope.  After I Googling it,  I determined that Cobain meant something completely different, but  in the end the song title ironically did make reference to an odor.  More specifically, fighting odors of the armpit kind….

Teen Spirit was first released by Mennen early in 1991, and with heavy advertising campaigns, it had soon “established a market niche” with teen girls.[3] However, one of its biggest boosts came from the grunge band Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” a song that was inspired by a friend of lead singer Kurt Cobain, Kathleen Hanna (lead singer of the punk band Bikini Kill at the time), spray painting “Kurt Smells Like Teen Spirit” on his wall (because Tobi Vail, Hanna’s band mate and Kurt’s then-girlfriend, wore Teen Spirit). At the time the song was released, Cobain had no idea that the brand even existed; when he did find out, he was rather upset that the song had apparently been named after a line of deodorant.[4]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teen_Spirit_(deodorant)

Thinking back to the stink…  When I was in Jr. High, grade eight I think, white leather Reebok shoes were all the rage.  Pretty much every kid had them, or wanted them.  And when I got mine, I was just happy to be in style.    A month later, sitting on the floor in a Phys. Ed class, I remember thinking, “What stinks?”  I sniffed closer to my shoes…  I took my shoe off.  Blah!  Sure enough, my feet were sweating up a storm in my leather shoes.  Together, my feet and the shoes were creating this horrid aroma.  Those shoes might have been trendy, but in a second, I vowed I’d never wear them again (at least at school).  I figured it was far better to be known for lack of fashion than to be known to have smelly feet.

Growing up in the eighties, most guys I knew went through the ever-popular BMX years.  And along with BMX-ing came Vans shoes from California.  Nearly every kid riding a BMX bike had a pair of those checkered Vans.  The black & white pattern was most common and early imports were of the slip-on variety.  Eventually different colored checkers and tie-up versions also made it to Canada.  Despite being popular and therefore deemed cool, these shoes were pretty much useless.  Skateboarders (or should I say skaters) might argue differently, but the rubber bottoms were crappy for running and the canvas tops didn’t breath (ah, yes, more stinky feet for me).  Since the shoes were slip-ons, it meant they also easily slipped off, often at unexpected and inopportune times.  It wasn’t uncommon to end up bare foot (or in stocking feet) while running a fast football play on the field.

Most the time, I proudly wore my Vans while riding my bike, but on two occations my prized shoes got shredded by the Bear-Claw BMX pedals on my Factory Kuwahara (for the lay person, that was the brand name of my BMX bike).  Never the less, my friends and I persisted and wore them anyways–all in the name of popular fashion.  Well, actually, we just wanted to be cool.

Below are some pictures of my bike that took me way… way back.  I had a KZ-02 model that was nearly identical bicycle pictured below (except my seat post was metallic blue, and I only had a one piece crank).  The last paragraph sparked my curiosity.  Here’s what I found online…

Below is a picture of an IRC BMX tire that came with my Kuwahara.  It only took about 2 months and I had to replace the back tire (as a kid, skids and power slides were extremely fun).

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Yesterday, I sent out a message to forty something friends on facebook letting them know that our friend and colleague, Chadd Milke, had been taken home to be with the Lord. In the last twelve hours, my mind has flooded my thoughts with memories of my dear departed friend…

Chadd and I go back a long time–even before facebook. We first met working for Blessings (BCM) back in the late 90s when, newly hired, he came to visit me at the Saskatoon store. At the time, Chadd was going to assist in managing the newly opened Winnipeg store. Right from our first meeting, I could tell that Chadd wasn’t cut from the same cloth as me, but I liked him immediately. Most people found Chadd to be a very like-able fellow.

A couple years later both Chadd and I would move to Edmonton, him from Winnipeg, me from Saskatoon, so we could both work at BCM’s new Support Centre offices. There Chadd’s friendship blossomed with his co-workers (Chris, Joy, Trisha, Janet, Christine, the Bobst girl whose name I can’t recall, Felix, Jim, Ruth, Sharon, Erin, Annie, Paul, Sheri, Sarah, Larry, Janice, Mark, and others I’ve forgotten–my apologies to you).

In those days, work felt like family. We had our good days, we had our fights, and we had challenges, but Chadd was one of those people who made going to work fun! He had a great sense of humor, and for those of us who invested our friendship in Chadd, we got to know one of God’s especially created personalities.

To say Chadd was a “music guy” would be an erroneous understatement. That fellow always amazed me with his passion for music. Many people have commented to me about my diverse and eclectic tastes in recorded music–Chadd’s interest, knowledge, collection, and appreciation makes me look like an amateur. And he knew artists and artists knew him too! I consider it a privilege to have introduced Chadd to at least one musician, Jesse Cook, considering that he introduced me to hundreds (if not thousands).

But Chadd wasn’t just into music; he loved reading books, and meeting and interacting with their authors. I recall he even was friends with Brock and Bodde Thoene, and Gilbert Morris (I think that was the fellow). Chadd was the most well read “music guy” in our business. Chadd also loved going to popular media and cinema–I recall going to Midnight Movie Premiers, like Lord of the Rings, with him and other friends from work.

In my work life, to amuse myself and try and lighten the mood, I dream up “camp’ names for my coworkers… If you’re lucky (or some might say, unlucky) I’ll share them with you. My camp names for Chadd included… Chadd the Milkman, “who always delivers”, Cha-Cha, Chadd-man-of-mystery, Mr. Rhondo, Chaddzilla, and Chad Solo ( I’m pretty sure he hated the last one the most since it was in reference to Han Solo from StarWars… Chadd would have nothing to do with StarWars; He was a Trekkie through and through).

There is no doubt that I got on Chadd’s nerves from time to time, but he was always very gracious and kind–truly a brother who modelled the fruit of the spirit. Chadd was also one of the most dedicated employees I’ve ever had the privilege of working with. His work ethic rivaled that of my mother, and she’s one of the hardest working people I know. A significant part of BCM’s success in those heyday years were built with Chadd’s sweat and tears. One warm summer afternoon, Chadd received one of the only Support Site award I ever recall being given–he won (and indeed deserved) to be The Support Site Employee of the Year.

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Eventually BCM sold, and the Support Site family was fractured with those who would move to Chilliwack, and those that move on to other things. For those of us who moved to Chilliwack, Chadd included, what we arrived to seemed like a TV Big Brother experiment gone wrong. The entire support staff was packed into two offices and a lobby, while the new headquarters underwent a complete renovation. Working in such tight quarters was challenging for all of us, but my Mom would later share with me that it was especially difficult for Chadd. The fact that all of us made it through with our sanity in-tact was only by God’s grace.

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In Chilliwack, I gained a new appreciation for Chadd. My kids were growing up, and Chadd was growing up in his own way. One of my favorite memories with Chadd was him going trick-or-treating with my kids, Mr. Woodward, and me. Jana and Justin, loved hanging out with him–he might as well have been their Uncle Chadd. When things wound down for me at Blessings, and my family moved back to Calgary, there was Chadd to say good bye.

Over the past few years, Chadd and I have connected by email and facebook, and I always appreciated how he’d bring new music to my attention. Even though we wouldn’t see each other face to face again, with Chadd, it always felt like he wasn’t that far away.

I think that Chadd was like that for many of us in that he had a unique friendship with each person. I’m sure my experience was different that yours, but it makes me appreciate how God uniquely created each and every one of us.

Chadd, rest assured my friend that you will be greatly missed, and that you made a bigger mark on lives than you might have imagined!  It was a pleasure spending time with you here on Earth, but I look forward to meeting you again in Heaven, and hearing about what great music awaits me there. While you’ve gone on ahead, I’ll be praying for your family and friends who will be missing you greatly.

Your friend,

Lane

Missing Chadd